Croump's Murals and Monuments Walk

Croump's Murals and Monuments Walk

The Devon and Exeter Institution is a library which is open to new members of all ages. Established in 1813, the Institution’s founding aim was to:
“promote the general diffusion of Science, Literature and the Arts; and for illustrating the Natural and Civil History of the County of Devon, and the History of the City of Exeter”. We became an educational charity in 1989.
Although we have many historic books, we are a living library and books about Devon and the Southwest continue to be acquired.

This App has been created so that people can enjoy and learn from one of the books in our collection, even if they are not inside the Library. W.G. Croump was an Exeter man and a paper bag manufacturer by trade. He had an amateur interest in architecture and specifically the inscriptions and monuments around Exeter. His drawings (1933-1940) form an invaluable record preserved between the covers of ‘Mural Monuments’. This book now has a life beyond the shelves of the Institution.

We hope that you and your family will enjoy using Croump as your guide around historic Cathedral Green.

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Croump's Murals and Monuments Walk Map

Mol's Coffee House

Mol's Coffee House

Mol's Coffee House
(Cathedral Yard 1 of 16)

This iconic building has been used for many purposes. This site was part of the college of the Annuellar Priests of the Cathedral who celebrated mass once a day at the altars of past benefactors and their families. The royal coat of arms on the building relates to the time when this part of the site became the Customs House for Exeter, then a coffee house and then an art gallery from 1833.

Look at the animals on the crest-What are they and what do you think they represent?

Look down the alley between The Royal Clarence Hotel and The Ship Inn to find the next stop.

St Martin's Gate

St Martin's Gate

St Martin's Gate
(Cathedral Yard 2 of 16)

The Cathedral Close was gated in 1286, after the murder of the Cathedral Precentor Walter Lechlade, on the 5th November 1283. Permission was given to the Bishop by King Edward I to enclose the Close with seven gates. The gate was a vaulted arch ornamented with tracery–remains of the arch can be seen on the upper wall of the corner building, which was built against the gate in 1450. St Martin's gate was one of three which allowed sufficient width for a cart to pass through – indeed stage coaches regularly used this lane to reach the Royal Clarence Hotel. The stone marker post defines the boundary between City and Cathedral property and is dated 1819, when the gate was removed to allow for easier access.


The next stop will be found down the alleyway next to St Martin's Church it is near a place where you could find yourself in 'a close shave'.

Oxenham Lodge Plaque

Oxenham Lodge Plaque

Oxenham Lodge Plaque
(Cathedral Yard 3 of 16)

The Oddfellows Friendly Society first came to Exeter in 1845. It is one of the oldest and largest, mutually owned friendly societies in the country. Legend has the origins of the society going back as far as 587BC in Babylon! The Society raised funds to build their own hall in Catherine Street and the letters on the plaque stand for the full name of the society – Manchester Unity Independent Order of Oddfellows. This building is one of the few in this street to survive the Exeter Blitz in 1942.

After some of the names are the letters P.G. Can you guess what these might stand for?

Turn back and look towards Cathedral Yard for the next stop.

Richard Hooker Monument

Richard Hooker Monument

Richard Hooker Monument
(Cathedral Yard 4 of 16)

Richard Hooker was born in Heavitree in 1554 and educated at Exeter Grammar School and Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Hooker was an English priest in the Church of England and an influential theologian. In his major work 'Of the Lawes of Ecclesiasticall Politie', Hooker defends and explains every aspect of the Anglican tradition and helped to find a compromise between opposing factions in the disagreements between Catholics and Protestants following the English Reformation.
The statue, unveiled in 1907, is carved out of white 'pentilicon' marble, by Alfred Drury RA (1856-1944), at a cost of a thousand guineas as a gift from some of his descendants.

Why do you think Croump chose to illustrate only the plinth of the monument?

To find the next stop- see if you can find the largest gap or entrance to Cathedral Yard.

Hint: It is between a shop the shares its name with a famous nursery rhyme and a restaurant that sells 'fast' pizza!

Broadgate

Broadgate

Broadgate
(Cathedral Yard 5 of 16)

Broadgate is the main ceremonial entrance to the Cathedral Close from the City. The gate was demolished in 1825 and is now a short street linking the High Street with Cathedral Yard. The stone post and the wall plaque are reminders of the date of demolition. The posts now mark the boundary between City and Cathedral property and it was intended that a chain would be hung between the posts to mark the dividing line. This tradition has now been abandoned.

Why do you think this gate was the main ceremonial entrance to the Cathedral?

Walk back towards the Cathedral for the next stop.

The Devon War Memorial

The Devon War Memorial

The Devon War Memorial
(Cathedral Yard 6 of 16)

The Devon War Memorial was designed by the architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, and made out of a single piece of Haytor granite. The Haytor quarry was reopened in 1919 especially to extract the stone for the memorial. It was unveiled in 1921 by the Prince of Wales. The dates inscribed are 1914-1919, instead of 1918, because the Devonshire Regiment was still fighting in Russia until the Treaty of Versailles was signed in 1919. Beneath the monument is buried a scroll listing the names of the 11,601 Devonians who lost their lives in battle in the First World War.

Look at the base of the memorial- Can you translate the Latin phrase?

The next stop is not far, look up to identify its pointy features.

The Three Gables

The Three Gables

The Three Gables
(Cathedral Yard 7 of 16)

The group of three terraced houses in the north-west corner of Cathedral Yard is known as the Three Gables. The present buildings are 17th century rebuilds of the 16th century originals. Frederick Drake, the stained glass craftsman responsible for some of the glass work in the Cathedral, lived and worked at No 4 from 1865 until the Second War. The publishers of 'The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady' were also based in one of the buildings.

Look out across the green-What do you think has changed since Croump made his drawings (1933-1940)?

To help find the next stop- face the Cathedral and walk to your right towards the Cathedral School.

The Old Deanery

The Old Deanery

The Old Deanery
(Cathedral Yard 8 of 16)

The Old Deanery is a medieval building dating from the 13thC. It was the Deanery from 1225-2005. Currently, it is the offices for the Diocese of Exeter.
The heraldic shield of a stag with a cross between its antlers is the symbol of the Dean of Exeter and can be found in many places in the Cathedral, such as over the Dean's stall in the choir.
Royal visitors who have stayed at the Deanery include: Catherine of Aragon (1501), Charles II (1671), William III (1688) George III, Queen Charlotte and three princesses (1789).
In 1501 the fifteen year old Catherine of Aragon came via Plymouth to Exeter on her way to marry Prince Arthur of England. (Following his early death her second ill-fated marriage was to Henry V111.) She stayed for a few nights in the Deanery to rest before continuing her journey. At that time the church of St Mary Major stood on the corner opposite the west front of the Cathedral. The weather vane on the church roof made a noise in the high winds and kept the princess awake at night so a servant was sent up on to the roof to stop it from turning.

Look at the iron gates on the central door of the Cathedral and see if you can recognise anything!

Follow the road along for the next treasure!

The Bishop's Palace

The Bishop's Palace

The Bishop's Palace
(Cathedral Yard 9 of 16)

The 14th century gateway of the Bishop's Palace leads to the hidden oasis of the Palace and gardens. It was first built in the late 12th or early 13th century. The medieval open hall survived until the Civil War, when parts of the palace were demolished and others much altered. In medieval times this was not only the Palace where the Bishop and his household lived but also a garden for growing produce for the household, a butchery, chickens and cows, a blacksmith, stables and more. The gatekeeper lived on one side and store rooms and cellars were on the other. The gatehouse was extended and restored in the 18th and 19th centuries and now houses the offices of the Bishop of Exeter.

Look through the gateway and you can see a large oak tree between the gate and the Palace. This is one of the finest examples of a 'first generation' Lucombe Oak, an evergreen cross between a Turkey Oak and a Cork Oak which was bred by William Lucombe in his nursery garden in Exeter.

How does the drawing differ from what is there now?

To find the next objects follow the road towards South St. Please be careful to watch your step as you will be out of Cathedral Yard and onto roads which are used by motor vehicles.

Palace Gate

Palace Gate

Palace Gate
(Cathedral Yard 10 of 16)

The Kennaway family made their fortune, as did many Exeter families, from the woollen trade and later in the East India Company. Their profits from the woollen trade declined during the Napoleonic Wars and the family business diversified.

Look closely at the decoration on the windows of 3 Palace Gate, the premises until 1975 for the Kennaway business. Can you guess what business they were in?

Keep looking around-Can you find the downpipe in the drawing?

At the end of the street turn left onto South St. The entrance to Little Southernhay Walk is just up on the left. Keep an eye out for other gate plaques and be mindful of moving traffic.

Wall Tablets in the City Wall

Wall Tablets in the City Wall

Wall Tablets in the City Wall
(Cathedral Yard 11 of 16)

The three coats of arms along this section of the City Wall are those of Bishop Robertson and mark the stretch repaired under his authority. He was Bishop between 1903 and 1916. Responsibility for the wall rests with those whose property backs onto it and the Bishop's Palace Garden is behind this section. He carried out an extensive programme of repairs. The coat of arms is divided between his personal arms and the crossed keys (St Peter – keys to the gates of heaven) and sword (St Paul – beheaded by sword) of the arms of Exeter Cathedral.

Look at all the different types of stone used to build the wall. It was first built by the Romans but has been repaired many times over 2000 years. Can you work out the date written in Roman numerals at the bottom of the shield?

Bishop Carey's Postern

Bishop Carey's Postern

Bishop Carey's Postern
(Cathedral Yard 12 of 16)

This gateway into the Bishop's Palace Garden is known as Bishop Carey's Postern. It is traditionally known as the Lollards Tower because Lollards were reputedly imprisoned within. Bishop Carey asked permission of the City to cut through the City Wall at this point to make a private entrance into the green spaces outside the walls but permission was refused on the grounds of security. The Bishop then asked permission directly from King James I himself and it was granted in 1623. In 1912 the tower was restored by Bishop Robertson who had his arms installed above the entrance to mark the improvements.

A postern is a secondary entrance into a fortified area which allowed the occupants to move discreetly in and out without using the main gates.

How is this shield different from the other shields in the wall?

Follow the path up the steps and turn left, you will find the entrance to Cathedral Yard ahead under the next stop!

Burnet Patch Bridge

Burnet Patch Bridge

Burnet Patch Bridge
(Cathedral Yard 13 of 16)

The Burnet Patch bridge is a Grade II* listed structure, located between Southernhay and the entrance to the Close. It forms part of the parapet walkway on top of the city wall. This walkway was used by the Mayor in order that they could continue their annual tradition of a murage walk-a ceremonial inspection of the city wall. The arched iron bridge was constructed in 1814 to span the 'New Cut' made in 1750 at the site of a 13th century tower. The bridge was built by Mayor Burnett Patch to make his regular inspections of the wall easier
The Touch Stone was removed and fixed to the wall below the bridge and is the original stone from the South Gate of the City Wall which was demolished in 1819. Traditionally visitors to the City would touch the stone to purify themselves before passing through the gate.

Notice the oil lamp brackets on either side of the bridge-can you spot the difference? This was to differentiate between the Cathedral side and the city side.

Walk towards Cathedral yard, you will find your next stop ahead on the left.

Window at #15 Catherdral School

Window at #15 Catherdral School

Window at #15 Catherdral School
(Cathedral Yard 14 of 16)

This window is in the wall of the Cathedral Chancellor's House, which was rebuilt on this site around 1500; the building now forms part of Exeter Cathedral School. The little window with a trefoil head and leaded lights belongs to the building of 1500 although many other alterations have been made since then.

Look at the half-buried window at pavement level-this was the result of the ground level being raised; what was once the ground floor is now the basement!

Follow the cobble path to your next stop.

Door to the Courtyard of the New Deanery

Door to the Courtyard of the New Deanery

Door to the Courtyard of the New Deanery
(Cathedral Yard 15 of 16)

The door dates to around 1600, made of Devon oak and typical of Exeter. The wicket door opens for visitors on foot; historically the full door was opened to admit riders on horseback or in carriages.
The 'peacock' carved in the arch is often used as a Christian symbol. The peacock sheds its old feathers every year and grows newer, more brilliant ones each year, a sign of renewal symbolising the resurrection of Christ.
Over the door is the coat of arms of Bishop Cotton (1598 – 1621). This consists of the arms of the Cotton family, with the Cathedral symbol (crossed keys of St Peter), surmounted by the bishops' mitre. A knotted 'cotton rope' below is a reference to his name.

Can you guess how many nails are in the door?

No clues for the last stop!

Devon and Exeter Institution Sundial

Devon and Exeter Institution Sundial

Devon and Exeter Institution Sundial
(Cathedral Yard 16 of 16)

This sundial was part of a Georgian makeover to the outside of the Devon and Exeter Institution. Originally built to house one of the cathedral clergy, the building was remodelled in the sixteenth century. In 1662, the Courtenay family, later the Earls of Devon, acquired the building as their town house.
In 1813 the Devon and Exeter Institution was formed "to promote the general diffusion of Science, Literature and the Arts, and for illustrating the Natural and Civil History of the County of Devon, and the History of the City of Exeter".

Look at the sundial-Do you notice anything odd about the numerals? You will see that the hours do not begin until "X" or 10am. Because the front elevation of the building faces nearer SSW than south, the sun is never far enough South to generate a shadow before this time.

An interesting fact: The actual part of the sundial that casts a shadow is called a 'gnomon'.

What time does the sundial say? Is it the same as the actual time?

Congratulations! You have finished the Croump's Murals and Monuments walk. We hope you enjoyed the walk whilst learning a little bit more about Exeter's historic Cathedral Yard through the eyes of W.G. Croump. Please come in to the Devon and Exeter Institution to get your prize!

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My Croump's Murals and Monuments Walk Notes

Croump's Murals and Monuments Walk

Croump's Murals and Monuments Walk

The Devon and Exeter Institution is a library which is open to new members of all ages. Established in 1813, the Institution’s founding aim was to: “promote the general diffusion of Science, Literature and the Arts; and for illustrating the Natural and Civil History of the County of Devon, and the History of the City of Exeter”. We became an educational charity in 1989. Although we have many historic books, we are a living library and books about Devon and the Southwest continue to be acquired. This App has been created so that people can enjoy and learn from one of the books in our collection, even if they are not inside the Library. W.G. Croump was an Exeter man and a paper bag manufacturer by trade. He had an amateur interest in architecture and specifically the inscriptions and monuments around Exeter. His drawings (1933-1940) form an invaluable record preserved between the covers of ‘Mural Monuments’. This book now has a life beyond the shelves of the Institution. We hope that you and your family will enjoy using Croump as your guide around historic Cathedral Green.

'Mural Monuments and Other Items of Historical and General Interest To Be Seen in the Streets of Exeter'
Original drawings by W.G. Croump, 1933 – 1940

The Devon and Exeter Institution would like to thank:
John Pelling and Rhodri Cooper for photographs
John Allan and Lindsay Roderick for historical input
Exeter Memories www.exetermemories.co.uk for historical input
Sara Pelling for coordinating the project

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