Exeter Arts & Culture Sculpture Tour

Exeter Arts & Culture Sculpture Tour

Welcome to the Arts and Culture Sculpture digital tour for Exeter University! This digital tour is one of discovery. Some of the artworks are hard to find, so you will need to use the map and information provided to search for them. The tour is numbered for your own ease, and it is best to complete the trail in the order provided. Each artwork has a point on the map, and you must click this point to read the information which will help you to find the artwork. The points are colour coded: the blue points signify that a work is outside, and the red points signify that a work is inside a building. There are various activities and challenges along the way that you can participate in. Please upload your pictures and comments as your walk around the tour. We challenge you to become an art detective and embark on this tour of discovery to find them all! Good luck!

Continue

 

The University of Exeter Arts and Culture Walk Map

Path

Path

Path
(University of Exeter 1 of 31)

Alexander Beleschenko

2011

Toughened glass, digitally printed

Location: The Forum, Stocker Road, Streatham Campus.

Stand outside of the back doors of the Forum building (the same side as Costa) and look up at the glass panels on the building where you will find the art work. This art work can be found on all glass sides of the Forum building.

Alexander Beleschenko is inspired by creating positive environments with light and colour. He was born in Corby in 1951 and is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects. He works from his architectural glass studio in Swansea.

This artwork was commissioned specifically for the University's Forum building. The sources of inspiration for the work are based on the University's environs and some of its research work. The colours in the artwork form a code, each representing a different letter of the alphabet, and all the words relate to the University. The text is broken up into themed blocks.

Complete the challenge below and then click the second point on the map to find written directions for the next artwork. You can also use the map to help guide you...

Take some interesting pictures of all the instances of this artwork you can find around the Forum and click here to upload them! Be experimental, think of different angles and locations you may be able to take these photos from.

A Dusting of Pollen

A Dusting of Pollen

A Dusting of Pollen
(University of Exeter 2 of 31)

Jo Golesworthy

2012

Pollen grains of common wild flowers enlarged approx. X 10,000 in limestone compound

On loan from the artist

Location: Sealed Courtyard, The Forum, Stocker Road, Streatham Campus

Walk into the Forum Building. Once you are inside, go into the Forum Library and down the stairs on the left hand side. Look around and follow the signs to the Lasok Law Library. Once you are there you will see the doors to the Sealed Courtyard on your right (where the sculptures are located). Please be mindful that the library is a silent study area.

By reproducing pollen forms in an architectural material Jo Golesworthy illustrates a botanic world, ubiquitous yet invisible to the naked eye.

Pollen grains are the microscopic protective caskets conveying the male reproductive cells of flowering plants. A wide variety of shapes and textures denote the identity of plant families, genera, species, and even local variation. Palynology is widely used in forensic science for criminal and archaeological investigation. Pollen sizes range from 5 to 500 microns in diameter although most measure between 20 and 80. (1 micron is 1/1,000 of a millimetre.) It was not until the development of the microscope in the 17th century that individual pollen specimens could be seen in detail.

After completing the task below, go back to the map and click on number three to find the next location.

How many artworks can you find amongst the plants in the Sealed Courtyard? Click here to answer.

Figure

Figure

Figure
(University of Exeter 3 of 31)

Dame Barbara Hepworth

1964

Bronze

Location: Forum Reception, Stocker Road, Streatham Campus

You must leave the library and go out of the front doors of the Forum building. Then turn left and walk up the steps at the side of the Forum until you reach the Forum reception...you should now find yourself standing outside the Forum reception. Go through the doors and you will see the art work on your left as you walk in.


Dame Barbara Hepworth is one of the most important figures in the development of abstract art in Britain.

"Figure" portrays the traditional elegant lines associated with her subtle synthesis of geometry and organic form. The artist's signature can be seen towards the back of the base.

The next artwork can be found in close proximity to this one. Go back to the map and click on number 4...

What does this art work make you think of? Tell us in the comments section.

Mists II: The Known & the Unknown

Mists II: The Known & the Unknown

Mists II: The Known & the Unknown
(University of Exeter 4 of 31)

Elaine M Goodwin

2009

Venetian mosaic gold

Location: Forum Reception, Stocker Road, Streatham Campus

You should currently be standing in the forum reception, look to your right to find this piece.


Elaine M. Goodwin trained at Exeter College of Art and Design. She has exhibited extensively and has written several works on mosaics and design.

This artwork was funded by the Class of 2012 Project and the University of Exeter. It is one of two mosaics on the theme of mist, directly inspired by the artist's visits to Venice. She has visited Venice every year for many years to see her friends at the Orsoni mosaic factory and buy the materials she uses in her work - the golds and the special glass called smalti. Elaine says she has "an intimate connection with the city, and have experienced it in every type of weather... This theme of relative knowledge for our human understanding and absolute knowledge for Truths is one I find myself frequently turning to.”

To find the next artwork you must leave the Forum Reception and turn left to walk up the hill. Before you leave, look at the question below.

The artist tells us that this piece was inspired by mist. What does it make you think of? You can respond with a poem if you feel like it.

UFO

UFO

UFO
(University of Exeter 5 of 31)

David Worthington

2007

Bottocino Classico marble

Location: Stocker Road, Streatham Campus, on the lawn outside the Exeter Northcott Theatre

After you have left the Forum reception, turn left and walk up the hill. Look for the sculpture as you walk.

Dorset-based sculptor David Worthington graduated from Oxford University in 1984 with a degree in Philosophy and Theology. He has subsequently completed an MA in both Visual Culture and Computer Arts. He sits on the Council of the Royal British Society of Sculptors and was elected a Fellow in 2009, and Vice President in 2010.

UFO is a moving sculpture made of marble that gently rotates when pushed. It was once on display in the world famous Abbey House Gardens, which claims to have a King of England buried somewhere within it. The UFO sculpture has since been relocated to the University of Exeter, and is currently on loan by the artist.

After you have completed the activity below, look for the next artwork. It's very close by. Click on the next point on the map to find it...

Spin the sculpture, take a video and upload it here. You can even sit on the sculpture if you wish!

The Minoprio Fountain

The Minoprio Fountain

The Minoprio Fountain
(University of Exeter 6 of 31)

Vivien ap Rhys Pryce

1988

Bronze

Location: On the brick wall outside the Peter Chalk Centre, Streatham Campus.

You should be able to spot this artwork from your previous location. Walk up the hill further and cross the road.

The sculptures of Vivien ap Rhys Pryce are based on the great tradition of figurative art. Human figures have been her main source of inspiration and they form the themes of many of her sculptures.

This bronze sculpture is named after the architect Anthony Minoprio who donated the fountain to the University in 1988. He worked on behalf of the Constance Fund, which was set up to promote water sculptures in public settings.

You will need to cross the road to find the next artwork. First, look at the task below.

What do you think about incorporating water with sculpture?

Sum of the Parts

Sum of the Parts

Sum of the Parts
(University of Exeter 7 of 31)

Peter Randall-Page

2001

Granite

Location: Queen's Drive entrance to the Northcott Theatre, Streatham Campus.

You will need to start to walk down the hill and you should discover this work on your left.

Peter Randall-Page received an Honorary Doctorate from the University in 2010. The artist has an interest in nature, and how it exists in dynamic tension between order and chaos. The geometry of nature, and its infinite variations, is the artist's key area of study.

We are aware of underlying mathematical principles by inference through the forms that nature produces, like the shadows on the wall of Plato's cave, hinting at perfection. Accepting the shape of the rock as a given the artist mapped the surface with a structure based on geodesic geometry which packs things together with optimum efficiency; nature loves economy.

Answer the question below and then continue walking down the hill to reach the next artwork!

Take a closer look at this sculpture. What does its shape remind you of?

Abstract

Abstract

Abstract
(University of Exeter 8 of 31)

Richard Kindersley

1975

Lead

Location: Exterior wall of Northcote House above the student entrance, Streatham Campus.

Richard Kindersley studied lettering and sculpture at Cambridge School of Art and in his Father's workshop. In 1970 he set up his own studio in London where he specialises in architectural lettering and sculpture.

This relief of curves and circles symbolises modernity, technology and communication. It was commissioned with relevance to the administrative function of Northcote House. The surface is embellished with a composition of curves and circles conjuring up a variety of human and totemic images.

After completing the task below, go back to the path and continue walking down the hill.

Totemism refers to practice of revering plants or animals as guardians or emblems, and is often linked to shamanism. What totemic imagery can you find in this artwork?

Figure for Landscape

Figure for Landscape

Figure for Landscape
(University of Exeter 9 of 31)

Dame Barbara Hepworth

1960

Bronze

Location: The Queen's Building Lawn, Streatham Campus.

As you walk down the hill, cross over onto the lawn opposite Queens building.

Born in Yorkshire in 1903, Dame Barbara trained at the Leeds School of Art and the Royal College of Art. In 1950 she set up a studio in St Ives where she lived until her death in 1975.

Although the form of this sculpture in bronze is reminiscent of a mother and child, its title is quite deliberate. Dame Barbara related the sculpture to its location in the environment as well as evoking a sense of being part of the landscape. Its presence on the University campus is entirely due to the artistic flair of the late Moelwyn Merchant, Professor of English at the University, 1961-1974, whose friendship with the sculptress facilitated the situating of her sculpture on the campus.

Complete your activity below and then walk across the lawn. You should see the next artwork.

Take a picture with your face peeking through one of the gaps in the sculpture. Be creative! Upload the best picture here and tell us why you like it.

Untitled

Untitled

Untitled
(University of Exeter 10 of 31)

Devon Area Students Association (DASA)

June 1989

Steel

Location: Queen's Drive Lawn, Streatham Campus.

Walk down the hill on the lawn.

This large and strikingly powerful sculpture commemorates the tragic events in Tiananmen Square, Beijing on 3rd and 4th June 1989. It was anonymously erected overnight in 1989 by some of the University's students and every June wreaths are laid against it.

The warrior figure with its lance outstretched is the modern equivalent of Don Quixote who sought to redress wrongs however he perceived them, and at whatever odds.

After completing your task below, walk back up the hill and you keep your eyes peeled for the next artwork.

Strike a pose! Can you copy the pose of the sculpture? Upload your picture here.

Skysails

Skysails

Skysails
(University of Exeter 11 of 31)

Paul Mount

1974

Stainless Steel

Location: Outside Wall of the Queen's Building, facing the Queen's Drive, Streatham Campus.

You should be able to see this piece as you walk up the hill.

Born in Newton Abbot, the artist studied art at Paignton School of Art and later at the Royal College of Art in London. He was initially a teacher at Winchester School of Art and later in 1955 in Lagos, Nigeria, where he established an art department at Yaba Technical College. He also developed as a sculptor whilst in Nigeria and in the 1960s he moved to St Just in Cornwall where he worked as a sculptor until his death in 2009.

In the same way that a ship's sails catch the winds, Skysails picks up light, re-presenting it with curved and polished stainless steel surfaces. Whether the day is clouded or bright, Skysails asserts its compelling presence. In the evening light, the pink brick wall is reflected on the sails and, seen from immediately below the sculpture acquires a spiky effect, almost reminiscent of a 'Tall Ship' in full sail, or cacti in the desert, perhaps.

After answering your question below, walk around the side of Queens building and alongside the car park.

Does this sculpture make you think of sails too? Click here to tell us what this sculpture makes you think of.

Partition 8/6 x 3

Partition 8/6 x 3

Partition 8/6 x 3
(University of Exeter 12 of 31)

Roger Leigh

1969, Purchased by the University in 1971

Mild Steel quarter inch plate

Location: Walkway between the Queen's Building and Devonshire House, Streatham Campus.

Go around Queen's building, following the path through the carpark and around to the left, until you emerge near Devonshire House. You should find the sculpture at the end of the path.

Roger Leigh trained as an architect and worked as an assistant in Barbara Hepworth's studio in the early 1950s. He returned to St Ives later in the decade and began his full time career as a sculptor. He also taught at the Exeter School of Art in the 1960s.

Composed of eight units of 6ft x 3ft mild steel quarter inch plate weighing approximately 11/2 cwt each, this sculpture was commissioned specifically for its location as a frame to the cornfields and meadows of the Higher Hoopern valley. The orange side responds to the warm ochre of the cornfields in the distance which could be seen before the present luxuriant shrubbery on the left obscured them. Passing between the two sections of the sculpture and looking back, you see the green side which likewise reflects the lawn beyond it.

After answering the question below, follow the path towards the Forum to find the next artwork.

What do you think about the colours of this artwork? What adjective would you use to describe them?

Man of the World

Man of the World

Man of the World
(University of Exeter 13 of 31)

Peter Peri

1960

Location: Devonshire House, Streatham Campus.

Stand outside the metal gates at the back of the forum and look up at the side of Devonshire House. This sculpture is difficult to spot.

Peri was Hungarian by birth and a refugee from Nazi Germany, active in British anti-Nazi groups. His work has its roots in social realism and his desire to be accessible to the public determined his choice of subjects and their execution, often using coloured concrete which he pioneered in the 1930s.

Created in 1960 to symbolise the new University's aspirations, reaching out to the World, the feet of this sculpture are encircled by rams' horns. This is an allusion to the roots of the University, the Royal Albert Memorial College in Exeter, now the Royal Albert Memorial Museum and Art Gallery in Queen Street, Exeter.

After completing the activity below, walk down the path alongside the trees.

This one is quite difficult to spot, can you find it? When you do, take a picture and upload it here!

The Peacock

The Peacock

The Peacock
(University of Exeter 14 of 31)

Student Art Society with Ed Crumpton

2013

Aluminium composite

Location: Poole Gate just below the Forum South Piazza, Streatham Campus.

You should find this at the beginning of the path.

The Peacock was designed by members of the University of Exeter's Art Society and built in collaboration with local Devon artist, Ed Crumpton. It was based on the theme of sustainability and was formed from materials used in the construction of the Forum in order to promote recycling.

The first band of the peacock's feathers provides the grounding to the following two layers, alluding to the extensions to the old university buildings; the Forum itself and the extension of the library. Furthermore, the two layers, adorned with glass beads, represent the two year time scale in which the Forum was constructed. The curve of each feather acts to complement the architecture of the building.

After answering the question below, continue to walk down the path.

Do you think that the feathers complement the architecture of the building? Tell us what you think.

White Entwined

White Entwined

White Entwined
(University of Exeter 15 of 31)

Deborah Duffin

2014

Various wires: recycled, electrical and galvanised wire

Location: Walnut Tree, Poole Gate, Streatham Campus.

Continue down the path and look carefully at the trees to your right...

This piece was commissioned by the university. The artist, Deborah Duffin, says she was inspired by “walking through the campus grounds”, as the surrounding trees tugged at her imagination. Duffin says she had an image of “sculptures entwined around trunks, held within the grasp of multiple branches, dangling from on high, and interlaced with the natural forms.”

Duffin explains the developmental process for this art piece: “I envisaged a shape, which would descend from a branch of the tree, with a tail providing both a visual link and the means with which to tie the work to the branch. The pale colours of the shape were selected to show up against the background of greenery, and the tail (entwined around the tree) allowed for a gradual change towards the colour of the bark – a mixture of pinks, greens, browns and greys. [...] The techniques I use of tying, twisting, bending and weaving become a visual equivalent of the meditative energy that goes into the making and somehow infuses the finished work with a quiet, but life-filled, state of being.”

Answer the question below and continue walking down the hill to find the next sculpture...

What does the artwork make you think of?

Lime Tree Sculpture

Lime Tree Sculpture

Lime Tree Sculpture
(University of Exeter 16 of 31)

Nigel Ross

2010

Lime wood

Location: Garden below Devonshire House, Streatham Campus.

As you walk down the hill you should see this sculpture on your right.

Nigel Ross lives and works in Scotland, working with fallen trees and creating immense wooden sculptures. He has family links with Exeter.

Sculpted in situ, this seat and table is made from the trunk of one of the trees cleared as part of the building works for the Forum. The sculptor has used the natural form of the wood to its full potential to create a seat, which is reminiscent of two basking crocodiles. A carved table accompanies the seat, so that people can sit on the sculpted seat and enjoy their surroundings with a picnic.

After examining the activity below cross the grass and walk towards Queens building.

You are half way through the tour now. If you like, you can sit on this sculpture and take a well deserved break. Take a picture of you sitting on this sculpture, tell us what you can hear, and upload it here.

Jauchzet

Jauchzet

Jauchzet
(University of Exeter 17 of 31)

Tom Grimsey

1994

Forged and constructed steel

Location: The Queen's Building Inner Patio, Streatham Campus.

Walk up the stairs at the side of Queen's building to reach the inner patio.

Tom Grimsey studied sculpture at Wimbledon and St Martin's school of art and was a 'Henry Moore Sculpture Fellow' from 1990-1991.

Jauchzet is both an exclamation of joy and a Graham Technique dance position. The sculpture, made in forged and constructed steel, reflects Grimsey's intention to make "a rich fully three-dimensional object which makes sense of itself with rhyme and reason". It is based on a Martha Green dance movement, and you are invited to view the work from different angles in order to appreciate the interacting rhythms of body and garments.

Walk through the doors behind the sculpture and go into Queen's building.

Strike a pose! Can you imitate the pose of this sculpture? Upload your picture here.

Galaxy M81

Galaxy M81

Galaxy M81
(University of Exeter 18 of 31)

Mabel Early

1986

Embroidered tapestry

Location: The Queen's Building, East Wing, Streatham Campus.

As you walk through the doors of Queens building you should see this tapestry on your right.

Mabel Early was born in Sheffield in 1910 and showed an early aptitude for drawing and painting. This interest was nurtured at school where she won a prestigious place at the Slade School to study Fine Art. At the Slade, in the early Thirties, she trained as a painter where the portrait of her was painted by M. Williamson.

This 7ft x 5ft tapestry evokes both a real and an imagined constellation. It was brought to fruition over a period of years.

After thinking about the activity below, turn around and walk along the corridor of Queens.

What materials do you think this is made out of? When you go home, why don't you try to make your own galaxy artwork using alternative materials? Upload a picture of your galaxy here.

Stargazer

Stargazer

Stargazer
(University of Exeter 19 of 31)

Janis Ridley

2001

Bronze

Location: The Queen's Building Cafe Patio, Streatham Campus.

Walking along the corridor in Queens to Queens Cafe. Walk through the cafe and exit through the glass doors to the outside patio.

Janis Ridley was born in Co Durham and studied sculpture at Newcastle upon Tyne School of Art and painting at Exeter college of Art, and graduated in 1976 with a BA Hons Fine Art. In 1998 she was elected member of the Royal British Society of Sculptors. Her work integrates her experience of drawing the figure with a deep interest in dance and certain myths.

This bronze figure is solid and centred, but just at the limits of comfortable balance. There is an interplay between the conditions of this world – flesh, metal, gravity and the aspirations and longings that make us look beyond them. In this case, literally to the stars.

Look carefully the next sculpture is very close...

Strike a pose! Copy the pose of this sculpture and upload your picture here.

Tension

Tension

Tension
(University of Exeter 20 of 31)

Moelwyn Merchant

1984

Painted mild steel with stainless steel wires

Location: The Queen's Building Cafe Patio, Streatham Campus.

This art work is located to the left of the previous one!

Merchant was Professor of English at the University between 1961 and 1974. He was encouraged to sculpt by his personal friend, Barbara Hepworth.

This piece reveals Hepworth's influence of incorporating wires into the space created by the form. It is constructed from painted mild steel with stainless steel wires, which give both a tension and helps to relate opposite parts of the form. The work resembles a mysterious musical instrument... perhaps.

Once you have answered the question below, re-enter Queens cafe and walk through the doors at the end of it.

What kind of music do you think this enigmatic instrument would make?

Five Days in May

Five Days in May

Five Days in May
(University of Exeter 21 of 31)

Peter Corlett

1984

Fibreglass

Location: The Queen's Building, South Wing, Streatham Campus.

Once you have gone through the doors at the back of Queens Cafe you will see a vending machine on your right. Go through the door behind this and you will find the sculpture.

Peter Corlett is an Australian artist who works mainly with fibreglass. In the past 40 years he has completed over 30 major public sculpture commissions. His work is inspired by his grasping for the mythic archetype. Peter describes his own work as "fundamentally humanist... about being alive". Many of his works are based on life models or photographs.

This fibreglass sculpture of a girl in a polka-dot bathing costume humorously commemorates the amount of rainfall in May 1984. It was built during the artist's year-long residency at the University of Exeter.

After you have answered the question below, go back through the doors your just came from and walk forward down the steps.

Does this work make you think of the rain? How does it make you feel?

Ascending Form

Ascending Form

Ascending Form
(University of Exeter 22 of 31)

Moelwyn Merchant

Presented to the University by the sculptor 1984

Teak

Location: Lower Foyer, The Queen's Building, Streatham Campus

You should find this on your right as you walk down the small set of stairs opposite the vending machine.

This piece, made from teak, was presented to the University by the artist in 1984. The artist himself acted as the Professor of English at Exeter University between 1961 and 1974, and was close friends with the fellow sculptor Barbara Hepworth.

This striking sculpture invokes a sense of gentle movement with its quasi-geometric progression. In Ascending Form you might see the hulls of racing-boats piled upon each other, precariously perched, ready to ascend or descend.

Please note that this sculpture is only accessible Monday to Friday in office hours.

After answering the question below, look to your right. The next sculpture is very close.

Does this sculpture remind you of boats? Where do you think they are going?

End Maze III

End Maze III

End Maze III
(University of Exeter 23 of 31)

Michael Ayrton

Purchased 1973

Bronze

Location: The Queen's Building, South Wing, Streatham Campus.

This sculpture is next to the previous one.

Michael Ayrton was not only a sculptor, but a celebrated novelist, broadcaster, art critic and historian, theatrical designer and film director. The Senate of the University of Exeter confirmed the bestowal of an Honorary Degree on Michael Ayrton in December 1976, but he died before it could be conferred upon him. He is believed to have been the only person to have had an Honorary Degree awarded posthumously at Exeter.

One of a limited edition of nine, this cast bronze sculpture forms part of a series entitled "Maze Predicament", which reflects Ayrton's interest in mythological and classical themes.

Answer the question below and then walk out of the doors to your right and down the stairs towards Queens car park.

What mythical creature or figure does this sculpture remind you of?

Kay Alexandra (Study)

Kay Alexandra (Study)

Kay Alexandra (Study)
(University of Exeter 24 of 31)

Witold Gracjan Kawalec

Purchased 1979

Alabaster

Location: Mary Harris Memorial Chapel, Prince of Wales Road, Streatham Campus

Cross the car park and go down the small set of stairs on the other side of the car park. Follow the path to the left until you reach the chapel. Go inside. This sculpture is located inside the chapel.

Born in Poland in 1922, Kawalec flew with the RAF during the war and regarded an overhead view of sculpture to be just as important as views from the North, South, East, or West. He spent over 30 years living in Devon, where he sculpted for and ran a sculpture park near Crediton.

This alabaster sculpture is a celebration of the birth of the sculptor's grand-daughter, hence its title. The sculptor himself noted that he intended the flowing shapes to give a sweeping movement, indicating feminine charm and elegance.

After answering the question below, continue into the chapel.

The artist intended to use the flowing shapes to indicate feminine charm and elegance. Does this sculpture seem particularly feminine to you?

The Feeding of the Five Thousand

The Feeding of the Five Thousand

The Feeding of the Five Thousand
(University of Exeter 25 of 31)

Norman Yendell

1973

Wood

Location: Mary Harris Memorial Chapel, Prince of Wales Road, Streatham Campus.

This sculpture is located on your right as you walk into the chapel.

Norman Yendell exhibited his wood sculptures in the University in 1973, and donated the entire proceeds of sales to Quaker Relief in Northern Ireland. In his retirement, he enjoyed the creativity afforded by wood sculpture, and portrayed numerous religious and mythological subjects.

Yendell's work usually concentrates on religious or mythological subjects. This wood sculpture depicts the traditional Biblical theme of loaves, fishes and baskets. It repays inspection from all angles to appreciate the details.

Answer the question below and then move further into the chapel.

Can you see the loaves, fish and baskets in this sculpture? What do you think they mean?

The Chapel Ceiling

The Chapel Ceiling

The Chapel Ceiling
(University of Exeter 26 of 31)

Sir Walter Thomas Monnington

1956

Painting on cedar wood

Location: Mary Harris Memorial Chapel, Prince of Wales Road, Streatham Campus

Look up!

Sir Thomas Monnington, born in 1902 and a graduate in decorative painting from the Slade School, was an official war artist in World War II. By the time of this commission he was developing a more abstract style.

The artist was commissioned to design and execute the painted cedar-wood ceiling for the University chapel which, with his two assistants, took him eleven months to complete. Illuminated by the light from the clear chapel windows, the ceiling is designed to glow much like stained glass windows.

After answering the question below, continue walking further into the chapel.

Do you think this ceiling looks like a stained glass window? If so, why do you think it was placed on the ceiling?

Triad

Triad

Triad
(University of Exeter 27 of 31)

Moelwyn Merchant

Presented to the University by the Mrs Collier in 2010

Granite and marble

Location: Mary Harris Memorial Chapel, Prince of Wales Road, Streatham Campus

You will find this sculpture near the altar, to the left. Please be respectful of your location and do not go past the red step.

This sculpture was crafted by Moelwyn Merchant, the Professor and Head of Department of English in the University of Exeter in 1961. He was encouraged to sculpt by his personal friend, Barbara Hepworth, and her influence can be seen in this piece.

The title 'Triad' (Menhir) references large upright standing stones, which were constructed during many different periods across pre-history, and they were erected as part of a larger megalithic culture that flourished in Europe and beyond. In modern Welsh, they are maen hir, or "long stone". It is constructed from marble, which gives a strong outline and appears weighty. It evokes a sense of grandeur but also draws attention to the shapes of the immediate world around us which surround the spaces in the work.

Don't forget to answer the question below! The next work is located to the right of the altar.

Have your seen any standing stones similar to this before? Tell us about them!

Breathing the Eternal

Breathing the Eternal

Breathing the Eternal
(University of Exeter 28 of 31)

Elaine M. Goodwin

2011

Venetian & Ravenna Mosaic Gold

Location: Mary Harris Memorial Chapel, Prince of Wales Road, Streatham Campus

You will see this on the wall behind and to the right of the altar. Please be respectful and do not go past the red step.

Elaine M Goodwin trained at Exeter College of Art and Design. She has exhibited extensively and has written several works on mosaics. Together with other prominent mosaic artists, she also founded Tessellated Expression for the 21st Century (TE-21), a group of professional artists dedicated to raising the profile of mosaic as self expression.

This piece is a triptych which explores the meaning of life. Placed in a sacred setting, as here in a chapel, the work takes on the deep symbolism of those who look with deep religious devotion. The gift of life to Christians by their Lord can be experienced within the light of the mosaic.

You must leave the chapel to find the next artwork.

What does this mosaic make you think of?

Seagull

Seagull

Seagull
(University of Exeter 29 of 31)

Barbara Jones

1968

Plate Steel

Location: Streatham Court Courtyard, Rennes Drive, Streatham Campus

This piece is a bit of a walk from the chapel. After you come out of the chapel, walk down the hill towards the main road and turn left. Walk along the main road until you reach the bottom of 'forum hill'. Walk towards the business school and turn left into Streatham Court Courtyard. You will see this piece on the grass in front of you.

Barbara Jones was a student at the Exeter College of Art from 1966 to 1969.

This piece evokes the form and movement of a seagull and was set into the Streatham Court patio. Its location near the beach stone fountain is a reminder of the close proximity of the sea.

Complete the activity below. You have probably already spotted the next work...

Can you see or hear any other seagulls around you today? Take some pictures or record a video and upload it here.

Snow Leopard

Snow Leopard

Snow Leopard
(University of Exeter 30 of 31)

Serena de la Hey with Grand Challenges students

2014

Willow

Location: Streatham Court Courtyard, Rennes Drive, Streatham Campus

This work is located beside the 'Seagull'.

Serena de la Hey is a modern innovator and is well known for her willow sculptures. Serena has been involved in many different projects all over the world such as the Willow Horse in 2004 or the Metaphors in 1993. However, her most well-known work must be her 12 metre sculpture next to the M5 motorway in Somerset.

This sculpture was created with a group of University of Exeter undergraduate students in the week 2 - 6 June 2014, and was overseen by De la Hey. It was created as part of Grand Challenges, wherein students undertake projects which address challenges for the 21st century. This particular group of students focussed on the challenge, "What sort of earth do we want for our children?"

The group decided to build a snow leopard as it is an endangered species, only 4,000 of them left alive in the wilderness. Using willow for the sculpture is a meaningful choice, as willow branches, even after being cut down, can flourish again - just as we hope the snow leopard will.

Answer the question below and then walk towards the business school, which will take you to the last point on the tour!

What do you think of the use of willow as a medium for this sculpture?

Touché

Touché

Touché
(University of Exeter 31 of 31)

Elaine M. Goodwin

2008

Mosaic

Location: Xfi Café, Streatham Campus

Walk past Touche cafe and follow the buildings round until you find the XFI Café. Go inside and you will find this mosaic on the wall on the left.

Elaine M. Goodwin is a former student at the Exeter College of Art and Design. She is the Founder President of BAMM (British Association of Modern Mosaic), and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Letters (DLitt) for outstanding contribution to the world of art, by the University of Exeter in July 2010.

Elaine M. Goodwin has always had a fascination with the Human form. She says it is, after all, the only organic form she is intimately connected with! The separateness and the coming together of one with another has been and continues to be a seminal theme for exploration by her since she was an art student. It is one which unceasingly inspires awe. This mosaic explores this concept...

Well done for finding all the points, you are a great detective! Thank you for taking part in our activities and questions! We have one final question for you to complete before you sit and relax in the café.

What is your favourite mosaic by Elaine Goodwin on this tour?

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My Exeter Arts & Culture Sculpture Tour Notes

Exeter Arts & Culture Sculpture Tour

Exeter Arts & Culture Sculpture Tour

Welcome to the Arts and Culture Sculpture digital tour for Exeter University! This digital tour is one of discovery. Some of the artworks are hard to find, so you will need to use the map and information provided to search for them. The tour is numbered for your own ease, and it is best to complete the trail in the order provided. Each artwork has a point on the map, and you must click this point to read the information which will help you to find the artwork. The points are colour coded: the blue points signify that a work is outside, and the red points signify that a work is inside a building. There are various activities and challenges along the way that you can participate in. Please upload your pictures and comments as your walk around the tour. We challenge you to become an art detective and embark on this tour of discovery to find them all! Good luck!

This tour, which was created by a group of third year students from the Performing Digital Humanities course, is based on an existing pdf tour which can be found on the Arts and Culture website <a href="http://www.artsandcultureexeter.co.uk/uploads/files/sculpture%20walk%20leaflet%20v%204%2015.docx">here.</a> Become an art detective and discover the art on Exeter University Streatham Campus!

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