Exeter City Football Club

Exeter City Football Club

Explore the history of Exeter City FC Club and Trust through this two hour trail through the streets of Exeter.

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Tour Map

St James Park (Stadium Way)

St James Park (Stadium Way)

St James Park (Stadium Way)
(Location 1 of 23)

Exeter City FC's first match was held here at St James Park on 10th September 1904. The team won 2-1 against the 110th First Royal Artillery. The winning goal was scored by Sid Thomas, whose career with the club would go on to last over 70 years not only as a player, but also a secretary, director, chairman and lifelong president. When ECFC turned professional in 1908, St James Park was developed to meet the standards of the Southern League. Despite a few games played elsewhere, this has been the home of Exeter City FC for over 100 years.

Once there was a large gate here, the Kendall Gate. On a Friday in late February 1981, when we had an FA cup run, hundreds of supporters slept overnight on the pavement by that gate, so when the shop opened on the Saturday morning to sell tickets for the quarter final match away to Spurs we would not miss out.

Were you there that night? Can you remember what you felt the first time you came here?

Exeter City FC Ticket booth

Exeter City FC Ticket booth

Exeter City FC Ticket booth
(Location 2 of 23)

29th August 1920 saw the turnstiles swing into action for the first time for a football league match. On this day, over 6,000 people made their way through the gates to watch Exeter beat Brentford 3-0, with William Wright scoring City's first ever league goal. Also on the pitch that day was local man and goalkeeper Dick Pym (b. 1893) who played for the club from 1911-1921.

Pym initially followed the family profession as a fisherman, something he continued to do through his career and after. Pym toured South America in 1914 but broke two ribs in the first game against Argentine North. Known as 'fisherman', 'scissors' or 'pincher', Pym was later signed by Bolton Wanderers for £5,000 - exactly the sum of money it cost the club to buy St James Park outright on Friday 24th June 1921. Did you ever queue to buy a ticket here? What was it like?

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Exeter City FC Stansfield memorial

Exeter City FC Stansfield memorial

Exeter City FC Stansfield memorial
(Location 3 of 23)

Adam Stansfield (b.1978) played a key role in Exeter City Football Club's promotion campaigns of 2008/9 & 2009/10 scoring 37 goals during that time. Tragically, Adam died of bowel cancer on 10 August 2010, at the age of 31, prior to the start of the game against Ipswich. The news broke out on the Tuesday night, during the match, and started to spread through social media. The match the following Saturday was postponed. His legacy lives on through the Adam Stansfield Foundation, which aims to help give young people the unique opportunity to develop life skills, through the power of football and to assist them in their goals of 'living the dream'.

A song dedicated to Adam is sung each week by the fans here at St James and his number 9 shirt was retired by the club as a mark of respect for nine seasons. Look up, and you will see his memorial so that he may always be with us. You too can pay tribute to him by learning about the Foundation's activities.

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The Grecian Centre

The Grecian Centre

The Grecian Centre
(Location 4 of 23)

Exeter City FC Football in the Community Charity works in collaborative partnerships to deliver inspiring physical activity, health and wellbeing and educational services for people of all ages across Devon. In 2012 the Charity engaged over 40,000 attendees within its services for children, young people and adults. The Community Trust is an extension of the football side of the club, and is about providing a central focus and facilities for the community. This program is an important aspect of the club that represents its ethos and has created a range of opportunities for people of all backgrounds, abilities and interests. A new state of the art Stansfield Centre for up to 50 young people has just opened on the Sowton Industrial Estate including a dual use sports hall, motor vehicle workshop, science lab, design technology and ICT suites and facilities. This is another way to remember Stanno.

The Charity's Strategy includes four areas of development, these are: Sports Participation; Education; Social Inclusion; Health. Here at the learning suite, Jamie Vittles and the team conduct a number of educational programs that include the Futsal and Education BTEC program and a Foundation Degree in Football Coaching and Development. Have you been part of this programme? What benefits do you think this work brings to a community?

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Exeter City FC Store

Exeter City FC Store

Exeter City FC Store
(Location 5 of 23)

Had this shop existed here at the beginning of the club's existence, then the merchandise inside would have been a very different and surprising colour as Exeter City FC started their playing days in green and white shirts - the same as local rivals Plymouth Argyle! In 1910 the players felt that this choice of strip was unlucky, and the decision was made to change to the more familiar outfit of red and white stripes, which made its debut in a match against West Ham United. A few other shirt colours have been worn as second or third choice kits over the years but red and white stripes have remained the key identity of the Club and its fans.

Have a look at this image of the McGahey family, all dressed up for the photo. Did you ever buy a shirt or a souvenir from this shop? How do you think the club's memorabilia sold here have changed over the years?

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The Fountain Centre

The Fountain Centre

The Fountain Centre
(Location 6 of 23)

This site has been tied geographically to Exeter City FC ever since they began playing here at the beginning of the 20th century. Over the years this place has had strong community links, in particular to youth work, and fittingly the building is now occupied by the Football in the Community Trust. This is also the site St James Church stood. Curate of that church was reverend Edward Reid (1879), a Canadian who came to England in 1897 to study at Oxford University.

City's first ever overseas player, he came to the Club after playing for Swindon Town and was he first ever player to score a hat trick for The Grecians. He was leading scorer in the first season (1904-5), making his debut at home to the 110<sup>th</sup> Battery Royal Artillery and ending the season as top scorer with 16 goals from 12 league games.

In December 1949 he held a collection at St James Park to help the restoration of his former church St Mary Arches which had been damaged in the blitz of 1942. Are you aware of any other ways in which City players helped communities in Exeter?

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Heart on the Big Bank

Heart on the Big Bank

Heart on the Big Bank
(Location 7 of 23)

The emblem that stands on the Cliff Bastin (b. 1912) stand represents the fans as the beating heart of Exeter City FC. Formerly known as the Duke Bank after the local MP who secured the land in order to extend the pitch to meet FA requirements, this part of the ground is most commonly referred to by fans as the Big Bank. The rough ground behind it, was once where the Supporters Clubhouse building was located.

Born in Exeter Clifford Sydney Bastin went on to become the most successful football player to represent Exeter City FC. Known for his ball skills and shooting ability, the Boy Bastin signed for Exeter at the age of 16 and quickly scored the first two of his 271 first class goals in a 5-1 victory over Newport County.

Signed by legendary Arsenal manager Herbert Chapman for £2,000, Bastin enjoyed a glittering career with the Gunners, with whom he won every domestic honour, representing England 21 times scoring 12 goals. He scored 178 goals for Arsenal a record that lasted until 1997 when Ian Wright overtook him, and his 150 league goals record lasted until 2006 when Thierry Henri finally broke that record. Bastin is still remembered by both clubs, with his image lining up alongside other Arsenal legends at the Emirates, while the Big Bank at St James Park has been named after him.

The Second World War curtailed his career at the age of 27, and, excused from military service because of his deafness, he served as an ARP Warden, continuing also playing matches to boost the Home Front morale. Bastin retired after the war in 1947 and ran the Horse and Groom pub in Heavitree.

Fans have stood and sung songs on this terrace through the highs and lows of the clubs history. The highest attendance of fans at St James Park came in 1931, when Exeter reached the sixth round of the FA Cup, and played here against Sunderland in front of a crowd of 20,984! Try to look through the cut-out square on the red door in front of you. Some fans have been seen watching the match from here.

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Old Grandstand

Old Grandstand

Old Grandstand
(Location 8 of 23)

The Old Grandstand, as you see it today, has stood on this site since it replaced the original grandstand after it burned down along with the players kit in 1925. This is the oldest part of the ground and has witnessed many of the changes here at Exeter City FC for the best part of a century.

This site is a good place to remember Arthur Chadwick (b. 1875). He joined Exeter City in 1908 and became its manager in 1910. He guided the Club through the Southern League, the First World War and onto the Football League in 1920. He died whilst sat here, watching Exeter City play Clapton Orient in March 1936.

More recent redevelopments of St James Park include the rebuilding of the Big Bank stand in 2000 and the replacement of the Cowshed terrace with the all-seater Flybe Stand in 2001. The adjacent former St. James' School building was refurbished into new offices, a social club and corporate hospitality, conference and banqueting facilities and is the hub of the Trust-owned club. What memories does the Old Grandstand bring back for you?

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St James train station

St James train station

St James train station
(Location 9 of 23)

As the nearest stop to the ground, St James Park Station represents the many times the team and its supporters have travelled across the country to represent the club and the city.

In recent years the club has been to Wembley twice and on the second time more than 20,000 fans saw City secure promotion back to the football league by beating Cambridge United 1-0 thanks to a 22nd minute header by Rob Edwards.

Trips to Old Trafford, Anfield, White Heart Lane and the other St James's Park have brought excitement to the fans over the years, but it was a trip to Workington in 1964 that provided one of the first great away days.

Needing a point to secure the first promotion in the club's history, the side, including legendary striker Alan Banks (1938), drew 0-0 and were met by celebrating fans down the track at St David's Station on their return. If you look at the Grecian Voices DVD, which brings together memories of supporters, players, trustees managers and volunteers, including children, you will hear Alan Banks remembering that they caught the midnight train from Carlisle to Exeter arriving at St Davids at 7 in the morning to find the station 'was absolutely packed with supporters'. The image of the smiling fans is telling. Have you followed City to any of these games?

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Odeon

Odeon

Odeon
(Location 10 of 23)

The Odeon Cinema represents part of the club's association with the world's oldest domestic club competition: the FA CUP. On the 8th of January 2005, Exeter City FC managed to draw 0-0 against Man United at Old Trafford in the FA Cup Third Round. Unfortunately in the replay on 19th January they lost 0-2. This second match was shown on the BBC and screened here at the Odeon.

This is not the first time an FA cup-tie has been shown at a theatrical venue in the city. In 1931 ECFC brought Sunderland back to St James Park thanks to a 1-1 draw at Roker Park. With a semi-final place at stake and demand for tickets at an all time high, the game was screened later elsewhere to accommodate an enthusiastic public.

Exeter City FC were also beaten that day 4-2, but the match set a record crowd attendance of 20,984, and took £2,561 in gate receipts. On both occasions the revenue generated went along way to secure the financial status of the club and to provide proud memories for the clubs fans. These events show the prestige and importance of being involved in England's premier knock out competition. What would your highlights be from City ties in the FA Cup?

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Red Lion Inn

Red Lion Inn

Red Lion Inn
(Location 11 of 23)

Look across the road. You should see a Turkish supermarket. This location is the former site of the Red Lion Inn and is one of the most important places in the history of Exeter City FC. It was here that in 1904 delegates of Exeter United, which formed in 1893, met with members of another local amateur side, St Sidwell's United (who formed in 1900 and were regular patrons of the Forresters Inn across the road) and decided to merge to form the club we know today.

From 1904 the club held its meetings here, and it is rumored that this pub (or perhaps one of the many other pubs on Sidwell St) was even used as the club's dressing room in the early years. The Red Lion was destroyed in the Blitz in May 1942, however despite many trials and tribulations of its own, Exeter City has survived - and it all began here!

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Duke of York

Duke of York

Duke of York
(Location 12 of 23)

The Duke of York has been, along with other local pubs such as the Wells Tavern, Sorry Head, The Bowling Green and the Black Horse, a popular meeting place for fans of both Exeter City FC and Visiting clubs for many years.

The pub is often a place where fans will gather together to anticipate the upcoming fixture or to discuss what went right...or wrong in the match they have just witnessed. Of course this is not for everyone, so what are your pre/post match rituals and what memories do you have of celebrating or commiserating a result away from the ground? Some people say that Cliff Bastin is associated with this pub. Do you know if this is true?

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Express and Echo (old office)

Express and Echo (old office)

Express and Echo (old office)
(Location 13 of 23)

For many decades, every game, goal and occasion related to the fortunes of Exeter's Football Club has been covered by the local newspaper the Express and Echo. There are many interesting headlines, and their study would tell us so much not just about Exeter City FC, and the Trust, but also about our history.

Check this one, for example, which reports an interview by Michael McGahey about the 1914 tour to Brazil, also cited in Mike Blackstone's 'Exeter City FC A Grecian Anthology', which is a great way to learn about the history of the Grecians: 'The Royal Mail Steam Packet Alcantara left Rio de Janeiro on 3rd July 1914, having on board a mixed company of English, French, German, Brazilian and Argentine passengers [...] the new declaration of War between Germany and France caused great excitement between the mixed body of passengers, and at last about 12 midnight, when the wireless message was received as to the declaration of War between England and Germany, the news had a most sobering effect. [...] Everybody felt that the world was fated with a terrible ordeal, the end of which no man could foresee.'

Documenting the events surrounding the club and the playing side is an important part of the world of football. What is your favourite Express and Echo headline? Have you ever reported on Exeter City FC? What headlines would you use to write about Exeter City FC?

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Ivor Doble jewellery shop

Ivor Doble jewellery shop

Ivor Doble jewellery shop
(Location 14 of 23)

For many years, Exeter City fan and Chairman Ivor Doble's name was synonymous with the fortunes of the club. The highlight of his tenure at the park came in the 1989/1990 season, where the side managed by Terry Cooper and captained by Shaun Taylor, went on to win the old fourth division championship - the first and to date only title winning side in the clubs history. Inspired by the goals of Darran Rowbotham, City remained unbeaten at home for the whole season and the club's officials and players paraded the championship trophy on an open tour bus of the city.

In September 2003, after City's relegation from the Football League, Ivor Doble sold his shares to the Supporters Trust, enabling the club to become fan-owned. Apparently the transfer of shares (over 50%) took place in this shop, which is owned by Ivor Doble, in front of solicitors and Martin Ellicott, a trust representative. In an article on the Independent written by David Conn (20/9/2003), you can read up how this put an end to a series of repossessions including the club's generator, tractor and lawnmower and even most of the office furniture. Others too donated shares and money. You can see a tribute to those who generously donated for the Red or Dead Appeal, at the Park. The tribute notes that without their effort, it is unlikely that there would have been a future for the Club.

Ivor Doble is now an Honorary President of the Club. You can check out some of these facts in Nick Spencer's Never Say Die: the remarkable rise of Exeter City.

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Jimmy Rigby shop

Jimmy Rigby shop

Jimmy Rigby shop
(Location 15 of 23)

Jimmy Rigby (b. 1886) was part of the side that travelled to South America in 1914. Exeter City was selected to do so by the Southern League that felt they represented a 'typical English football team', the tour contained a number of memorable games and incidents; none more so than the 2-0 victory over Argentine Champions, Racing Club de Buenos Aires, a match which had to be temporarily abandoned when the secretary of the South American side brandished his revolver towards the ref in frustration at City taking the lead!

Jimmy Rigby was later a director of Exeter City for many years. Early in his career, he combined playing whilst working as a cotton spinner in the textile industry, and later owned three shops in this area which were run by various members of his family. There was one here at Sidwell Street, near where Sainsburys currently is, one at the top of Paris Street, and one near the Old Tiverton Road roundabout. The shop here and the one near the Old Tiverton Road roundabout were destroyed during the 1942 Blitz on Exeter.

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East Gate

East Gate

East Gate
(Location 16 of 23)

The origin of Exeter City FC's 'Grecians' nickname has been debated many times over the years with suggestions ranging from links to political parties, clock inscriptions and greasy children. However, the key reason is likely to relate to the boundary set by the old city wall that ran across this spot, as all those who lived outside the East Gate of the walls were known as 'Greeks' or 'Grecians'. This may have been a reference to the Greeks in the siege of Troy or perhaps the biblical meaning of 'Greek', which is used to refer to 'anyone but us'.

What is certain is that this border-related title included the people of St Sidwells and by association the founding members of Exeter City FC, St Sidwells FC. As a result of this and the location of the St James ground, the name has stuck and the club and its fans are still proud Grecians to this day. Can you expand on the origin of the term Grecians?

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McGahey the tobacconist

McGahey the tobacconist

McGahey the tobacconist
(Location 17 of 23)

Michael John McGahey (b.1873), whose family has run this tobacconist for four generations, was a local solicitor and Exeter City FC chairman when the club travelled to the continent of South America. It was during this tour that the side became forever known as 'Exeter City, da Inglaterra, o primero quadro proffisional que jogou no Brasil' or 'Exeter City from England, the first professional team to play in Brazil'.

During the tour City played the newly formed Sele��o of Brazil in a game that ended 2-0 to the South Americans. Yet beyond the result, this fixture gave the fledgling republic a symbol of its identity and gives Exeter the distinction of being the first team ever to have played against the nation that would go on to win the World Cup five times! McGahey sent some reports back to England from the Alcantara on its troubled journey back. Did you watch the friendly fixtures between Exeter and Brazil in May 2004 and will you watch the one in July 2014? Would you like to send us some reports?

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Dunn and Baker solicitors

Dunn and Baker solicitors

Dunn and Baker solicitors
(Location 18 of 23)

Aged only 16 when he began playing for St Sidwells Utd, Sidney Herbert Thomas was a leading goal-scorer for the side and became club secretary at 18. Along with his Dunn and Baker colleague, Michael McGahey, Sid was part of the group that formed the club, and also scored the winning goal in their first ever match.

Sid took a very young Cliff Bastin to the Dunn and Baker offices, then located elsewhere, to meet the then Arsenal manager when he first tried to sign him for City. Cliff refused and the guy followed him home and kept pestering him until he signed.

Sid's off-field abilities saw him become club secretary for 35 years, before going on to officiate in roles as director and chairman for the club. In 1957 he stood down as chairman. However, a financial crisis saw him donate money to help the club and return to the park to become life president of Exeter City FC. A true one club man and Exeter City FC legend! Who else do you think is a great player who should be part of this history trail?

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Gourmandine Creperie and Bistro

Gourmandine Creperie and Bistro

Gourmandine Creperie and Bistro
(Location 19 of 23)

Frenchman Bertie Cozic (b.1978), who opened this restaurant when he retired, played a key role in Exeter's back to back promotion campaigns and is one of a number of foreign players to wear the red and white of Exeter City FC.

The first of these players to receive a full international cap was promotion-winning Dermot Curtis, who played for Ireland (Eire) against Austria in 1963; one of 16 appearances at the top level.

In recent years International football has even come to St James Park, with The England Women's under 21s taking on Bertie's home nation France in November 2006. The game ended 1-1. Do you have any memories to share of international players? Are there any players who made international appearance whilst playing for Exeter City?

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Royal Clarence (ABode Exeter)

Royal Clarence (ABode Exeter)

Royal Clarence (ABode Exeter)
(Location 20 of 23)

The turn of the Millennium saw troubled times at the park, with Exeter dropping out of the league on the verge of their 100th anniversary. However things could have been much worse as City almost went out of existence entirely due to financial problems.

Thankfully for the club, the Exeter City Supporters Trust stepped in and secured the future of the Grecians through business savvy, strong vision and, most importantly, coming together as a community. Exeter City FC became one of the first teams in the country to be recognized as a fan-owned club, and the hard work and effort of the Trust in securing this dream and the future of the club was evident at a fundraising event held at here Michael Caines' Abode Restaurant

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Exeter Guildhall

Exeter Guildhall

Exeter Guildhall
(Location 21 of 23)

It was here at Exeter's historic fourteenth century Guildhall, that manager Bobby Saxton greeted the fans to acknowledge their support at the end of the 1976/77 season.</p>
<p>This was a particularly significant moment, as having lost only one of their last 14 games, and winning the final 6 matches (including a 4-3 victory having been 3 goals down at half time to Barnsley!) Saxton's side had won promotion for the second time in the club's history.

The achievement was secured with a 3-0 win away to Doncaster with goals from Alan Beer (2) and record signing Tony Kellow, and following the final game of the season at home the club were invited to attend a civic reception at the Guildhall by the Mayor of Exeter. More than 2000 fans and well-wishers gathered here to celebrate with Saxton and the team, and the air was filled with deafening cheers, songs and chants when they emerged on the balcony. Were you here at that celebration? Can you tell us what it felt like?

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Queen Street Celebrations

Queen Street Celebrations

Queen Street Celebrations
(Location 22 of 23)

The High St was the scene of celebrations not once, but twice in both 2008 and 2009. It all began in 2006 when Team Bath manager and former Exeter City FC player Paul Tisdale (b. 1973) was brought in to replace outgoing manager Alex Inglethorpe. In his first season, Tisdale's side narrowly missed out on a return to the Football League, losing 2-1 to Morecambe in the first play off final at the new Wembley. However the next year they made no mistake beating Cambridge United 1-0 to end their 5-year exile. Things got even better the following season when, after a strong campaign, victory over Rotherham saw Exeter City FC finish second to the then named Coca-Cola Football League 2 and secure back-to-back promotion campaigns for the first and only time in their history.

Tisdale is possibly the most successful manager the Grecians have had. He was named among the League's top 10 managers in 2008, and as of the beginning of the 2013/14 season is the longest serving manager in the Football League.

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RAMM

RAMM

RAMM
(Location 23 of 23)

In 1991 the Royal Albert Memorial Museum and Art Gallery (RAMM) was home to the Exeter City Football Club Exhibition, which celebrated the history of the club following the championship-winning season the year before. Since 2012, you can see a looping digital display showing how people's lives have changed in the last 50 years. The display features news stories from the 1960s such as Exeter's football match with Manchester United, as well as city centre shopping and family holidays. This is the ï¬rst in a series of digital exhibitions developed with community groups using content supplied by local people.

In 2013 and 2014, Exeter City Supporters Trust, Exeter University and the Northcott Theatre will host an exhibition and a play, respectively, celebrating the centenary of the famous match between Exeter and Brazil. In 2013, RAMM, in collaboration with the University of Exeter and 1010 Media developed this trail. If you were to curate your own exhibition here at RAMM, what object would you chose to represent Exeter City FC and why?

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My Exeter City Football Club Notes

Exeter City Football Club

Exeter City Football Club

Explore the history of Exeter City FC Club and Trust through this two hour trail through the streets of Exeter.

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      (i)be blasphemous;
      (j)be in breach of official secrets legislation;
      (k)be in breach of any contractual obligation owed to any person;
      (l)depict violence, in an explicit, graphic or gratuitous manner;
      (m) be pornographic, lewd, suggestive or sexually explicit;
      (n)be untrue, false, inaccurate or misleading;
      (o)consist of or contain any instructions, advice or other information which may be acted upon and could, if acted upon, cause illness, injury or death, or any other loss or damage;
      (p)constitute spam;
      (q)contain pictures of children under the age of 16 years whose parental consent hasn't been completly gained;
      (r)be offensive, deceptive, fraudulent, threatening, abusive, harassing, anti-social, menacing, hateful, discriminatory or inflammatory; or
      (s)cause annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety to any person.
    4. Your content must be appropriate, civil and tasteful, and accord with generally accepted standards of etiquette and behaviour on the internet.
    5. You must not use our website to link to any website or web page consisting of or containing material that would, were it posted on our website, breach the provisions of these terms and conditions.
    6. You must not submit to our website any material that is or has ever been the subject of any threatened or actual legal proceedings or other similar complaint.
  10. Report abuse
    1. If you learn of any unlawful material or activity on our website, or any material or activity that breaches these terms and conditions, please let us know.
    2. You can let us know by email by clicking here: trust@ecfc.co.uk
  11. Limited warranties
    1. We do not warrant or represent:
      (a)the completeness or accuracy of the information published on our website;
      (b)that the material on the website is up to date; or
      (c)that the website or any service on the website will remain available.
    2. We reserve the right to discontinue or alter any or all of our website services, and to stop publishing our website, at any time in our sole discretion without notice or explanation; and save to the extent that these terms and conditions expressly provide otherwise, you will not be entitled to any compensation or other payment upon the discontinuance or alteration of any website services, or if we stop publishing the website.
    3. To the maximum extent permitted by applicable law we exclude all representations and warranties relating to the subject matter of these terms and conditions, our website and the use of our website.
  12. Limitations and exclusions of liability
    1. Nothing in these terms and conditions will:
      (a)limit or exclude any liability for death or personal injury resulting from negligence;
      (b)limit or exclude any liability for fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation;
      (c)limit any liabilities in any way that is not permitted under applicable law; or
      (d)exclude any liabilities that may not be excluded under applicable law.
    2. The limitations and exclusions of liability set out elsewhere in these terms and conditions:
      (a)govern all liabilities arising under these terms and conditions or relating to the subject matter of these terms and conditions, including liabilities arising in contract, in tort (including negligence) and for breach of statutory duty.
    3. To the extent that our website and the information and services on our website are provided free of charge, we will not be liable for any loss or damage of any nature.
    4. We will not be liable to you in respect of any losses arising out of any event or events beyond our reasonable control.
    5. We will not be liable to you in respect of any business losses, including (without limitation) loss of or damage to profits, income, revenue, use, production, anticipated savings, business, contracts, commercial opportunities or goodwill.
    6. We will not be liable to you in respect of any loss or corruption of any data, database or software.
    7. We will not be liable to you in respect of any special, indirect or consequential loss or damage.
    8. You accept that we have an interest in limiting the personal liability of our officers and employees and, having regard to that interest, you acknowledge that we are a limited liability entity; you agree that you will not bring any claim personally against our officers or employees in respect of any losses you suffer in connection with the website or these terms and conditions (this will not, of course, limit or exclude the liability of the limited liability entity itself for the acts and omissions of our officers and employees).
  13. Indemnity
    1. You hereby indemnify us, and undertake to keep us indemnified, against any and all losses, damages, costs, liabilities and expenses (including without limitation legal expenses and any amounts paid by us to a third party in settlement of a claim or dispute) incurred or suffered by us and arising directly or indirectly out of:
      (a)any breach by you of any provision of these terms and conditions; or
      (b)your use of our website.
  14. Breaches of these terms and conditions
    1. Without prejudice to our other rights under these terms and conditions, if you breach these terms and conditions in any way, or if we reasonably suspect that you have breached these terms and conditions in any way, we may:
      (a)send you one or more formal warnings;
      (b)temporarily suspend your access to our website;
      (c)permanently prohibit you from accessing our website;
      (d)block computers using your IP address from accessing our website;
      (e)contact any or all your internet service providers and request that they block your access to our website;
      (f)commence legal action against you, whether for breach of contract or otherwise; and/or
      (g)suspend or delete your account on our website.
    2. Where we suspend or prohibit or block your access to our website or a part of our website, you must not take any action to circumvent such suspension or prohibition or blocking (including without limitation creating and/or using a different account).
  15. Third party websites
    1. Our website includes hyperlinks to other websites owned and operated by third parties; such hyperlinks are not recommendations.
  16. Competitions
    1. From time to time we may run competitions, free prize draws and/or other promotions on our website.
    2. Competitions will be subject to separate terms and conditions (which we will make available to you as appropriate).
  17. Variation
    1. We may revise these terms and conditions from time to time.
    2. The revised terms and conditions will apply to the use of our website from the date of their publication on the website, and you hereby waive any right you may otherwise have to be notified of, or to consent to, revisions of the terms and conditions. / We will give you written notice of any revision of these terms and conditions, and the revised terms and conditions will apply to the use of our website from the date that we give you such notice; if you do not agree to the revised terms and conditions, you must stop using our website.
    3. If you have given your express agreement to these terms and conditions, we will ask for your express agreement to any revision of these terms and conditions; and if you do not give your express agreement to the revised terms and conditions within such period as we may specify, we will disable or delete your account on the website, and you must stop using the website.
  18. Assignment
    1. You hereby agree that we may assign, transfer, sub-contract or otherwise deal with our rights and/or obligations under these terms and conditions.
    2. You may not without our prior written consent assign, transfer, sub-contract or otherwise deal with any of your rights and/or obligations under these terms and conditions.
  19. Severability
    1. If a provision of these terms and conditions is determined by any court or other competent authority to be unlawful and/or unenforceable, the other provisions will continue in effect.
    2. If any unlawful and/or unenforceable provision of these terms and conditions would be lawful or enforceable if part of it were deleted, that part will be deemed to be deleted, and the rest of the provision will continue in effect.
  20. Third party rights
    1. These terms and conditions are for our benefit and your benefit, and are not intended to benefit or be enforceable by any third party.
    2. The exercise of the parties' rights under these terms and conditions is not subject to the consent of any third party.
  21. Law and jurisdiction
    1. These terms and conditions shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English law.
    2. Any disputes relating to these terms and conditions shall be subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England.
  22. Our details
    1. This website is licensed and operated by Exeter City Football Club.
    2. You can contact us by using by email to trust@ecfc.co.uk
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